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CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 11:00pm EDT
the habit of generating a lot, looking up to the law, the rule of law and above all to the law of loss in the constitution. and so for them, you can see this in the where woodrow wilson trees the federalist. he talks about it all the time but as an acquaintance with the. he never studied it carefully as one might in many colleges and universities today because he is soon to the meaning of the federalist was with the federalists did, accomplished, the works that preceded from a, the doctrines of the federalist or optional. they belonged to the world that had been surpassed by contemporary american, and this was a principle that the presses supplied rather versus the to religion as well as to education and the politics. that is why president obama is not embarrassed to say, as he says in his second book, the audacity of hope, that he believes a living constitution. the phrase, and to a large extent the idea come from wilson . that turn sounds so green, so natural, so organic. one of those averments the laws that republicans are always opposing. that's a deliberate distraction. a liv
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 8:00pm EDT
industries. they were passing right to work laws. they were receiving lots of funding for the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war with the soviet union, so states like mississippi, states like georgia, texas, florida, southern california, arizona and north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population. just think about it. this period from 1964 to 2008 can be thought of this kind of the period of sunbelt dominance in the american presidential history. if you think about it, every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sunbelt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was not even elected vice president. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia, ronald reagan from california, the first george bush from texas and bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election it's in being the four-year period of sunbelt dominance. there were issues that we
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:45am EDT
agree with you with their level of investments. >> second row on the side. >> after rule of law committee for the oceans, in the mid century, nicholas said geography was one of the most important factors in foreign affairs because it was the most permanent. this year we just saw the arctic icecap dropped another 750,000 square kilometers and appears to be opening more this session. what do you think this trend will mean not next year or even next decade but in a generation as that becomes more open for russia and canada in particular. >> nicholas pikeman is someone i devote a whole chapter to in this book because he is very provocative and here is the man who when it was unclear that china where defeat japan, predicted that china who is our ally at the time would become our adversary for geographical reasons and also said when europe was fighting for its life against germany, united europe could be a competitor for the united states. she was very clear volume. in terms of the arctic icecap, this is playing out over decades. if you had an arctic open for shipping and a close frie
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:00am EDT
best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurably to the eisenhower scholarship and i have to agree he was underestimated definitely and i'm so glad that you have written such a powerful book. i think it's fascinating in reading the book to see that more of the book is focused on the military career, even though as you've just spent almost most of your time talking about the incredible eight years of of the eisenhardt registration, the estate leaned over and whispered to me i have never heard the interstate highway system applauded before. pretty exciting. first-time. >> all those people who were applauding are now going to get on 395 and be stuck in traffic or three hours. [laughter] powerbook is a different kind of book.
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 11:00am EDT
state. we can practice our laws as we see fit. >> more about harriet beecher stowe's this weekend as booktv, american history tv and c-span local content vehicles with behind-the-scenes at the history of literary life of augusta, maine and noon eastern on booktv on c-span2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> michael grunwald presents his thoughts on the $800 billion stimulus bill, the american recovery reinvestment act signed into law by president obama on february 17, 2009. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thanks, all of you, for coming and braving the rain. i am thrilled to start by 4 in new york. my wonderful parents are here. the only new yorkers who go to florida to visit their grandchildren. there are a lot of facts and figures and fun characters and colorful stories. i knew it was going to be controversial and it would be revisionist history of the obama stimulus and everybody hates the obama stimulus. obama he did too. a year after it passed a percentage of americans who believe the stimulus created jobs was lower than the percentage of americ
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 8:00am EDT
career in the '60s was hardly ever mentioned. some women went on to navy medical school or law school but most women were expected to have a job until they get married and have children. we came to "newsweek" thinking that this is a fabulous, and it was, a very glamorous job to have in those days. we started as actually women were hired on a male desk to deliver the mail. and you graduated to clipper where you clicked newspapers and deliver them to the riders. if you are really good you got to be a researcher. that was a real exciting job because, in fact, you worked on the stories of the week that were breaking news. you worked with writers, reporters, the editors. and those of us who work in the sections in the back of the magazine, from medicine or the arts or lifestyle or religion, did a lot of reporting as did the women in the business section because new york was the financial capital of the world. so we got to be reporting in addition to the fact checking. and it was a very collegial place. we were good friends with the writers and reporters. it was a patriarchal place.
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:00am EDT
congress if you got arrested? [laughter] you violated the law. and i said they were bad laws. their customs, they were tradition, and we wanted america to be better to live up to the declaration of independence, make real our democracy. when i got arrested the first time this books and i felt free. i felt liberated and today more than ever i feel free in the liberated. abraham lincoln 150 years ago freed the slaves but it took the modern-day civil rights movement to elaborate a nation. [applause] i know some of you are asking where did you get the name "across that bridge," where do to get the title from, life lessons and the vision for change? just like a few short years ago since this is an election year, hundreds and thousands and millions of people come in 11 states and the old confederacy from virginia to texas couldn't register to vote simply cause of the color of their skin. people stood in line. it took a state like the state of mississippi in 1963, 1964, 1965 more than four need to keep those in the but only about 16 those and were registered to vote. there was a county in
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 1:45pm EDT
cannot relate to some of the obstacles that you face. more women than men are in law school and medical school now. wind elizabeth dole would describe how she was one of 24 women at harvard law school, it really is an older notion at this point, and i think it distances her from the younger audiences. i don't think it is a good idea for our modern women candid it's debbie describing the obstacles that they face and how unique they are because we tend to resist voting for someone who is the first of anything because it seems scary and throw another good idea because we have never done before. i think taking attention away from that is better. >> and not labeling issues as women's issues are feminist issues. at think all of the women in the book really did not run as women . there is a book called running as a woman. i cannot remove the first name, but when pat schroeder ran the first time for congress out in colorado somebody asked her, do you plan on running as a woman and her response was, do i have another option. end it is obvious that this is a woman. obviously have never ha
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 9:30am EDT
washington dc, they wrote into the south where was segregated and they refuse to follow the laws. they were very brave. so i have a character, a young man who was on that bus. and his mother says system, those people are going to kill you. and he discovers that she is right, they really do want to kill him. i'm sure many people in the audience will remember that in the younger people will have heard of it anyway. tremendously dramatic. and i found out about this stuff, it's still moving. encourage the people who had studied the notion that if you are attacked, unjustly attacked, the best thing to do is to do nothing. some of these people just, you know, stood there were laid bare and took the punches and kicks. i have found it is strictly moving to read about this stuff. and i'm hoping that i will be able to, you know, bring that to millions of people. >> in some ways, that is like the lloyd george thing. they show what it really is. >> that's exactly right. that was their theory. and it's a good theory. but what i have had the guts to do that? i don't think so. >> doing something about som
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 3:00pm EDT
rule of law. and perceived political infractions are met with harsh punishment. punishment, i should add, that it onmeeted out to three generations of a family. a political offender knows when he goes to prison, his parents and his children will probably go with him. there are probably about 200,000 north koreans today in the gulag, and more than a million, perhaps as high as two million, have already died there. the reason we know all of this, and much, much morning is thanks to the testimonies of north koreans who have escaped. these are the people i write about in my book. this knowledge comes to us despite the best efforts of the kim family regime to keep it secret. ever since the end of the korean war, north korea has been sealed off from the world's eyes. the kim family regime has pursued an isolationist policy and it maintains an iron grip on information. access to which is very strictly controlled. to give just one example, every radio must be registered with the government. and its dial must be fixed to the government-run radio station. to enforce this rule, security police
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:45am EDT
historical, i'm talking about legal rights. i'm sure there are some lawyers or law students here in the room, and when you read the book and you read legal documents about declaration, the accord in 1920, you understand that there are gigabytes, international 19 legal rights of jews to the land. but there's something else which i haven't found elsewhere when i wrote the book, and i call it the common sense right. when you go to a war and you win a war, you don't give land you wondering that were. and what's happening now, since we won the war, and the side that was aggressive and started the war is coming to us and saying, you know what? i want my land back. it doesn't work that way. even here in the u.s. when it was with mexico, and you want, nobody came to you and told you, you know what, we lost the war, we want our land back. and i think the common sense right is something that states very straight to you. and our neighbors should know that if they would start another war with us, they would not keep any price. on the contrary, if you lose, you lose. and i think talking about the ri
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 4:30pm EDT
department and it's like the sixth most powerful law enforcement agency in the world. it's huge. and i said, why would somebody -- why did deputy sorenson volunteer for this beat? he said, whatever it was, it was his mission to protect god's creation. i thought that really told me a lot about deputy sorenson, and as you read my book you'll see that it's not just a line he threw out. deputy sorenson was -- interestingly enough he and kueck were the same side of a coin. and when he was called to meth labs he would take in abused pit bulls, and i wound up getting to go to his house during the eight years i was working on my book, and it turned out that all the animals he rescued were still at the house, which is an amazing thing. their spirit was there on his land, and it was very powerful, and kueck, too, his best friends were animals and he talked to bobcats and had breakfast with jack rabbits, so these two men, -- hermit and a sheriff, even the one went bad, had much in common. kueck had two kids and he became -- he longed for them -- this is the longing i explore in my book and kind o
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 5:00am EDT
are told this is the other suppression. we're told this is a return to the jim crow laws. well, frankly 80 percent of americans support the total idea pools. the thomas is a high percentage for any issue, even high and another that your humble pie because people are estranged and some people. chieftains of hispanics and african-americans support photo id. in fact, rasmussen asked, they believe and for a is a serious issue? 63 percent of whites said yes and 64 percent of african-americans said gm's. african americans in some places live where a machine controls the political left that the live under. frankly it allows the crime rates to skyrocket. the biggest victim of flow from is minority reformers and veterinarians were political machines control the destiny in the can't fight city of. the mayor of detroit who until recently was serving in public housing after conviction for crimes, he won his second term in part because of a flood of fraudulent ballots. the city clerk cluster job after that. abilene were asking for another florist, a town we could extend free finlandia's to
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:00pm EDT
job. the brennan center at nyu school of law has been thorough investigation at the idea of voter fraud. they say basically it doesn't exist. there've been 10 or 12 cases in the first 10 years of this century out of hundreds of millions of those spirits someone may register as mickey mouse, but mickey mouse never shows up in rows. but nevertheless, rove has initiated a cam pain and its allies in more than 30 states legislature of having votes requiring voter ids. now part of the democrats are saying this is a severe form of voter suppression. that is in many cases you find the elderly was given up their drivers licenses, but it's perfect years, the out they no longer have a government issued i.d., so they are not allowed to vote. you have minorities that is hispanic. one of the challenge is hispanic timebomb. now there'll be 70 million in 2020. if they start to vote on that, it's going to be curtains for the republican speakers 10 million hispanics in texas alone. states like texas and arizona will flip from red to blue very soon, when sakic said. so this is one thing they're tryi
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 12:30am EDT
important in the story is just an law so i thought it was time somebody brought that story to light. >> we are the maine state library in a public reading room and were going the maine author's collection. in the early 1920s, henry tunick who is the state laboring at the time started collecting books by maine writers trying to get them signed whenever possible and it has grown into this. >> welcome to maine's capital city on booktv. with the help of our time warner cable partners or the next 90 minutes we will explore the literary culture of this area as we visit with local authors and explore special collections that help tell the history of not only this state but the country as well. >> this is the first parish church in brunswick maine and it's significant to the story of uncle tom's cabin. in many plays places stories began here. it is here in this pew, pew number 23 that harriet beecher stowe by her account saw a vision of uncle tom dean clips to death. now uncle tom, as you probably know, is the title, the hero of her 1852 novel, uncle tom's cabin and the story of uncle tom's
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 12:00pm EDT
of what the laws of the state or the country said at the time. she came to brunswick because her husband got a job at bowdoin college. he stayed in ohio and and later moved to andover, in order to complete his contract there is a professor. she came without him with their children, and she was also six months pregnant. and she moved to brunswick in order to take up residency here, awaiting the arrival of her husband. the stories that were told of harriet beecher stowe is that she was a small and petite woman. she did not take much care in terms of how she dressed. but she was also very numerous for a woman of her time. she was known then mostly as a housewife. she wrote that she was totally overwhelmed with the number of children -- she had seven and she was pregnant -- that is what you would see as an overworked housewife and mother who came to worship here, probably with her children and her sisters, catherine beecher, and they all became members of this church. we first meet uncle tom in his hut. he is in a slave huts. he is learning to read the bible. the bible is an inner te
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 1:00pm EDT
john roberts who is the chief justice of the united states. he was hired to be a law clerk. john roberts then ended up serving in the ronald reagan administration and in the supreme court in 2005 succeed william rehnquist after he died from thyroid cancer. what is the legacy do you believe? >> guest: i see that john roberts as being rehnquist's natural air. >> now, roberts is a worn just partisan. his methodology is more conservative than william rehnquist, and there has never been it court is conservative, according to the academic studies, there has never been a court that is more conservative right now than the roberts court, at least not since 1987 when records are being analyzed and kept. i think that roberts is very much different in some respects. i'm not sure that rehnquist would've voted as roberts did. i'm not sure that he would voted as part of the affordable care act. >> i was betting against roberts, too. then what would have happened is that somebody else would have stepped up. i think that roberts is different in some ways. he is much more polished in dealing with
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 4:00pm EDT
comet that would seem to be the law of the jungle is aware, are categorically different as well. we can certainly see this radical dehumanization inerrant history. black slaves are not only that they are, but were fundamentally different than their white slave owners. never remaining wholly in the realm of either philosophy or psychology, but i was training samples from her experience in the world, smith argues that they want to overcome our tendons used to dehumanize, which lead to atrocities and genocide, we must look these tendencies square in the face. we must study down honestly, openly, in order to control them. "less than human" has garnered lavish praise from scholars. in the evolutionary psychology, looks like smith should be required reading for all with a social conscience. his ideas that define their way into every school curriculum. the psychologist paul bloom calls it a beautiful book on an ugly topic. charles w. mills, dean of moral philosophy calls it, and i quote, a powerful and original work that forces us to recognize the monstrous atrocities are routinely carried out
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 10:00pm EDT
stronger steps to rid us of the media of testing. ever since no trial left behind was enacted into law is a national psychosis. not just bad pedagogy but something psychotic. my father was a psychiatrist and used to take me to the back toward the of the mental hospital in massachusetts. some of the people in the most severe depression, the only way to ease discomfort was it to number everything. restlessly a moving objects around to get them in the right pattern dead number them. i don't know. i think some of the bureaucrats who gave us this law maybe they would enjoy this day in a recovery house to get over the numerical addiction. judging teachers and children primarily on the basis of a very narrow slice of mechanistic skills to be measured simplistically by standardized exam and ruling out the consequence, ruling out to the rich forms of culture like reading books for pleasure. what other reason is there to read a book and the way? but pleasure is not tested. no points for pleasure. asking koppel questions? indulging curiosity? developing real critical capacity so when they grow up ca
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 8:15am EDT
the one hand, in flagrant violation of international law, china hands back refugee repatriates to north korea, where they are sent to be tortured and sometimes executed in the political concentration camp. and yet obviously, we know that without china turning a blind eye, much of the great work of the underground railroad couldn't take place. so that's a puzzle and a question for policymakers. the role of international humanitarian aid to the regime, one may not do so much of it is going to be siphoned off raises another interesting moral and political questions. and finally, the overall united states policy objective, lisa stated policy objective over the last decade and a half of reunifying the peninsula, when in fact it appears that all of the parties most central to policymaking in north korea and those nations that may attract even have more to say about the pass of north korea don't really want to peninsula to be reunited for rational reasons on their own part. these are all the questions that are raised, but they are raised by melanie in a book that is not fundamentally a p
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 12:45am EDT
do for you? incited in there the asian doctors are worse than nine the law. he did not want to go back to jail. he vowed he would never go back. we will use the nine asian and doctors. >> bank cannot have global blanket. >> u dollar sign jeht? >> i cannot have been, it's meadows, and a c-span mike they agree. talking to headquarters they were rescinding like that in his arms got very tired. don said the man solitary. i have chronic fatigue syndrome. those cops will shoot me on sight. >> know they will not. >> don't tell my mother. i have got to go. >> i can't have the sheriff back in 10 minutes. keep on the phone for five minutes. we don't want a little kid to find it. >> i don't do there. i will get my a class is. >> hold on. stay with me. you will hear someone talk. quit moving channels. we will find the one you are on. and might take a week. the radio is getting hot. that is to. in this is 320. you sound smarter than i am with police radios. >> i don't want to get arrested or killed. >> nobody bonds to kill you. there is probably a 1 billion cops out there. , now. >> the conver
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 10:00am EDT
been in the other financial institutions and the answer is that there is no law that they could hang them on. they could find nothing illegal and it wasn't for the want of trying and that's why we've still not seen the high level executives go to jail and why they are trying to push forward all of this nonsense financial reform the haven't been able to do. >> i don't know if it was for want of trying. >> you have the attorney general and the banks to own the place as upset about the senate. there wasn't an urge to prosecute. there were three questions i just want to be fair to affairs if you could change any part of the book, what would it be? >> that's a good question. i wonder if they mean if i would have written something or if the book history could have been different. >> if i would have written something differently that is an interesting question. i would like to have actually talked to kerry killinger, so that would have changed. i could have spent the entire book talking about the last month because there were so many politics and the decision appeared. >> has anyone been fa
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 7:00pm EDT
and then in lebanon where those powerful group in lebanon is has the law. so they want to break that up. the u.s. was to write that up. israel wants to break that up. the fall of assad is desirable in that sense follow the doe wants syria to implode altogether and break up and cause a free-for-all of surrounding powers that would cause a regional and even international conflagration that would be a danger in all of this and inside syria it has become very, very apparent, the longer this conflict goes on the more sectarian this because about 12, 13 percent of the country, christians about 10% for the most part support the assad regime because it has -- very secularized. and therefore there will be a buffer against any sort of conservative state from developing. the regime that, as you said earlier in the aftermath, if that should happen, there could be retribution and revenge against these minorities who have supported the regime. and so the nature of the crisis has become very sectarian whereas the opposition is almost entirely soon the arab. they will put out and allied are christia
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:00pm EDT
people fought that as the historian john law points out, left out of this account were competing narratives and i'm quoting, one of those narratives was a story of slavery, emancipation and freedom unquote. his mandate is long to put that narrative back into the official account of the civil war. in his other works since that book including beyond the battlefield race in the civil war passages to freedom the underground railroad and history and memory and they slave no more, two men who escaped to freedom including their narratives of emancipation. and countless articles, essays and lectures david blight has returned this theme of memory and commemoration and what it means to conflate the subjective accounts with fact and history and not to recognize them as subjective at all. now he comes to us with that -- "american oracle' the civil war in the civil rights era which brings this new ones exploration into the 20th century. as we approach this as quick -- sesquicentennial blight brings to light for american writers with their own perspectives to bear on the centennial of the civi
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 1:30pm EDT
materials from his office in the law firm in new york city, and it's still getting awards and generating material for his career and so they come to rest over time. in 1990 having just been elected the senate majority leader, mitchell was involved in the 1990 amendments to the act and this is a letter from george h. w. bush thanking him for his collaboration and succeeding in getting that legislation passed. the 1990 amendment was important for us today. we paid $4 a gallon for gas in the sense that it was the amendment that discussed the composition of gas and the introduction of chemicals during certain seasons of the year in order to make for cleaner air. in a sample of his writing style. there are researchers to come because they're interested in particular topics but there's also people that come because the interested in particular techniques or approaches. some people are interested in the newspapers because of the negotiation for instance. and so this is a research question that bridges a variety of the records that we have and others are interested in his rhetoric. ho
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 3:00pm EDT
into law is the kind of national psychosis, but there's something psychotic about it. it can't be numbered. it doesn't count. my father's psychiatrist use to take me to the back boards of mental hospitals in massachusetts and so many people on the most severe depression the only way they could ease their discomfort is by numbering everything. they would restlessly move object surrounded the table to get them in the pattern, and as i mentioned, some of the bureaucrats in washington maybe they would enjoy este in the recovery house to get over this numerical what action. this hoping of judging children and their teachers primarily on the basis of that very narrow slice of purely mechanistic skills that can be measured more simplistically by standardized exam and ruling out as a consequence ruling out all of those more authentic forms of culture that are not reduced to numbers like reading books for pleasure. it's the only reason i read a book. you get no points for pleasure or asking thoughtful questions or indulging curiosity, developing real critical capacity so when they grow wha
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 7:00pm EDT
for originalism in constitutional law. well, i'm here to say something about the argument of this book, which as you can have heard is called "i am the change." and the title is meant to bring out president obama's louis the xiv side. louis the xiv said -- i am the state. and mr. obama became very close in an press conference to saying i am the change. the title is actually from suggestion of my editor. and publishers, i had entertained another possibility, which was actually suggested to me my my friend bill. barack obama, what the hell were we thinking? [laughter] as opposed to some of my conservative colleagues and friends, i don't think we get very far by labeling president obama a socialist or by trying to trace his foreign origins or his secret muslim "devotions" nor i do think even that we greatly alumni nate things by to -- as my old friend argues in his movie and two books about obama. i think it's fairer to begin fairer and more useful in the end -- excuse me. to begin admitting president obama is what he call himself namely a progressive or a liberal. and the rest of th
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 6:00pm EDT
-- berkeley where he attended law school. he was, i'm sad to report, not much of a student, but he was a joiner of fraternities and maker of friends. and it was there at berkeley that he came of age just as california bulldozed its way into a new kind of politics in state history. the political movement that warren was witness to was, importantly from the his perspective, led by a trial lawyer. even as a somewhat shy young boy, warren had dreamed of practicing law in a courtroom, and as a college student he had the opportunity to watch up close one of the most arresting trial lawyers of his generation. hiram johnson, of whom i'm speaking, was a young lawyer in san francisco who was could upon to take over a corruption case against the city's mayor and some co-conspirators in a bribery scandal. he took over the case, he was second chair of the case at the outset but took over the first chair when the lead prosecutor was shot in the head in court by a dismissed juror. law students, take note. [laughter] it -- johnson made his name in that case and went on to serve as governor of cali
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 10:30am EDT
, something stays for recruiting industries, passing right to work laws. they were receiving lots of funding for the federal government to build military licenses at the time the united states is involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, georgia and texas and florida and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. i mean, just think about it. the period from 1964 to 2008 can be thought of this kind of do. if sun belt dominance in american presidential history. when you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008, comes from the state of the sun belt. bennett johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected, not even vice president come as a guest account he was michigan. jimmy carter, ronald reagan come the first church veteran texas va connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. the 2008 is a watershed election. it ends his 40 year. if sun belt dominance. and
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 5:00pm EDT
he hit the silver screen. but the character in the " conspirator" is much law-abiding and much more manipulative and vicious than the joseph holt i know and underhanded. i think one of the things that the film tries to suggest is the federal government largely in the person of edwin stanton and the person of joseph holt basically railroaded poor mary to her death, and without any interest in what the truth was. they determined that she how would hang regardless and they went after her poor mary. and this just isn't the way the assassination trial played out. there was no deal between stanton and holt to make sure that she was convicted an son. it makes him out to a truly vengeful, two-dimensional character and doesn't reflect who he is as i know him. >> during the administration must have been a difficult job. could you sort of expand upon what that job was maybe before the war and the job that he ended up in? >> well, the job the before the war was basically there was one person who had a small office who kept track of whatever sorts of military sense occurred in an army that was 1
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 12:00pm EDT
sketches of the 1930s. some of them think that i'm a fat person and say that we should pass laws preventing this kind of obesity, and create ways to federally subsidize weight-loss programs. who do they blame? they blame mcdonald's. why is that? because they sell delicious and fattening cheeseburgers and fries along with salads and mcnuggets an awful lot of other things, even the beloved happy meal is under assault. under assault by politicians all around the country and by some who call themselves scientists. one group of the very official sounding name, the center for science in the public interest, threatened to sue mcdonald's if they did not stop serving happy meals. they equated what mcdonald's was doing was child abuse and even worse, equated to child molestation. stephen gardner said in a prepared statement, he said it is a creepy and predatory practice that warrants an injunction. let's face it, it was gardner's statement that sounded creepy. the fact is that liberals hate mcdonald's and its competitors because they symbolize everything about america that they load. our e
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 7:00am EDT
remember the three laws of dynamics. so yeah, i take your point but my point is less would've the undergraduate, i don't know we can argue but how important that is, but more, i take your point about the commercialization and the browsers and all that was definitely private, occasional borrowing for more basic research, but my point was that seems like a really critical element was sort of just was the critical mass of people out there, and the guys who founded google were guys who were getting their ph.d's at stanford, you know, and they developed an algorithm out of their training. and just the fact that she did have people working on systems engineering, and it's less the undergraduate but more the government finance, dod research, networking capabilities and all that. look, it's sort of unprovable but there is a story that the critical mass that few -- field itself is built up out there and if you want an explanation for why it happened here and so little happen if their. >> guest: one thing i would say is this. in leading up to 2000 women got to the peak of the internet valua
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 6:45am EDT
of law. the second is equal citizenship for all, all the citizens, muslims and other faiths or no faith at all. the third one is universal suffrage. it's a majority. the fourth one is accountability. when you're elected you are elected, you have to come back to the citizens to be checked, not to be democracy elected for life as we had with us on and the family. so this is what we had with the world before. the fifth what is judiciary of authority. and differentiating the state from religion when it comes to power. meaning by this it's not because -- you are divorcing th two. in the united states of america you know the separation is exactly the same as european secretaries. for example, when you talk about this in france, we are the only secular society. the united states of america is not a secular society because you have, you can't in france say god bless france. you can't say that. that's mixing, confusing everything. so even though you can think about it but you can't say it. but point is the relationship is important to is islamist majority countries, it can be separating wi
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 8:45pm EDT
sacrifices the joys of family life so the rest of us can feel safe. my son-in-law is currently on his eighth deployment. my daughter and the spouses spof special operations are my heroes. fear is part of they ever -- their every day. i was so broken at the time i was asked write my chapter, i had trouble expressing myself. there's input from my husband, his wife, his high school sweetheart, and his naval academy friends. matthew's story would not have been written without their input and i deeply thank them. this book, "in the shadow of greatness," will help america understand the sacrifices, the love of country, and the courage of the brave men and women and the families of the greatest military force in the world. freedom isn't free. god bless our military families, and god bless america. [applause] [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you, lisa. thank you, mrs. freeman. war brings us sorrow and weakness, but through the challenges we faced over the past ten years at war, we also got stronger. and several of my classmates, seth, who is a proud marine, scholar from princeton has
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:45am EDT
cannot relate to some of the obstacles that she face. more women than men are in law school and medical school now. and so, when elizabeth dole would describe how she was one of 24 women at harvard law school, is really an older notion at this point. if you get distances her from the younger audience is. so i don't think it's a good idea for modern women candidate to keep describing the obstacles they face and how unique they are because we tend to resist voting for someone who was the first of anything because it seems scary and probably not a good idea because it's never done it before. so i think taking attention away from that is better. >> and not labeling issues as women's issues are feminist issues. i think all the women in the book really didn't run as women. there's a book called running as a woman. but when pat schroeder ran the first time for congress on colorado, someone asked her to come her to come into play and is running as a woman? her question was, do i have another option? [laughter] it is obvious this is a woman. it's obviously never had a woman president. so
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 1:40pm EDT
there in 1979? >> guest: fortunately, it was not. some of my in-laws where they are and were able to get out. my wife and children did not come to tehran. this one in the foreign service recalled an unaccompanied posts come a post about family. we had been in saudi arabia before and they stayed on in udi arabia, which is a good place for them. it was a great relief for me being captive, knowing that the were safe and in a secure place >> host: finally come any ptsd issues for you? >> guest: none that i'm aware of. i know it hasn't been easy -- o course, these are not easy for some people. as you can tell probably peter, one of my best therapy is talking about it and talking about these issues. i mean, once in a while things come back about the incident. but as i said to you, the damage done to harness i think was much less than what was done to our iranian friends and relatives. poster we have been talking on booktv with her for sir john limbert, author of this book, "negotiation with iran: wrestling
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 7:00pm EDT
area. grandchildren and a stepdaughter and a son-in-law that is here. so i want to affirm my connection with the l.a. region. thinking about the predicament we are in in this country today reminds me that charlie brown cartoon the one where lucey goes in the backyard and sets up a table that says psychiatry 1 cent. charlie comes up and says, he puts his penny down and she says charlie, in order for me to help analyze you and your problems, of life as a voyage on a great ocean liner. are you one of those people who takes your chair of the bowel and looks into the future to see where you're going or are you one of those people that takes your chair to the store man looks back to see where you come from and he thought a moment and said i'm having trouble getting my chair unfolded. [laughter] so here we are. i will share with you a couple of quotes from my book this one is louis brandeis. we must make our choice. we have democracy or we may have wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both. and then a comment from john w. gardiner who was not only a cabinet secretary to
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 11:15am EDT
demonstrators, saying they are breaking the law. vidal defended demonstrators commencing their practice in a constitutional right. the exchange became more heated and incoherent. oakley cited oliver wendell holmes, whom you must despise. vidal cited the constitution. buckley interrupt you. and some people were pro-subfloor. some people were pro-subfloor and were well treated by the people ostracize them an answer ostracizing people take on other other people to shoot an american marines and soldiers. i know you don't care, vidal. as far as i'm concerned the whole crypto nazi i can think of is yourself. howard k. smith, let's not call names. and buckley delivered the insert heard around the world. now listen, you clear, quit calling me a crypto subfloor oral sock you in the face. let's stop calling names. buckley: and you'll stay plastered. but myra breckenridge go back to his and start making allusions to not see them. i s in the infantry in the last were. vidal: you were not in the infantry. as a matter fact i meet in front in the war. buckley: as anime butchery. vidal: you were not. you we
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 10:45pm EDT
shook his hand and that was it. i have thought about the story law. it is a metaphor for the difficulty had. there is a challenge to vase. there is no straightforward way of a figure that is as controversial. sometimes wonder if this is not a way to carry his baggage. goodness knows, he has some. the other challenge was to fight the urge to not simply walk away to place walk away to place himself in position. with living breathinguman being. what i wanted to do is to write a history of strom thurmond america. in a critical and dispassionate way touche beach of our on america's, to have a measure of reason to these issues that embroil politics today. that is the goal. that is the mission. what are the issues of the strom thurmond history speaks to? a lot of us remember who he was. the 1948 dixiecrat presidential candidate. strom thurmond was a lead author of the 19567 manifesto, the protest of the supreme court decision brown verses education. he is a record holder to this day. 24 hours, 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil-rights bill. he was one of the last jim crow demagogues. w
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 10:00pm EDT
. one more crucial move in his life after he leaves no walking goes to stanford law school is becoming a clerk to supreme court justice robert jackson. tell us a little bit about how that came about because i want it to lead into what you are unfolding here into this conservatism on blacks and whites. >> guest: right. jackson was i think seen by the end even as a great justice and he had been the prosecutor at the nuremberg war trial and it actually taken time off from the court and went to nuremberg as a chief prosecutor in and came back to the court so rehnquist graduates from the stanford law school early at the end of 1952. he was actually in class that would have graduated a semester later but rehnquist finishes working and was so smart he got out early. and so he wanted to -- it was clear when i was researching through his papers and looking at the diaries that he had actually, that were on deposit with his papers were fascinating. he had six notebooks that were filled with his reminiscences and his desires and early comments and memoirs and one of the things that was clear was tha
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 9:00am EDT
ended up not having real breakthroughs the publish the law but didn't really change, didn't have a disruptive idea. what they found was you can judge this by looking at the citations of each paper and how many times each paper was cited by other papers because all this stuff is online now and archived and what they found was the innovators, the ones who had profound new ideas had this interesting pattern where they have a lot more failed papers and published them, far more volume to their work and a huge number of those papers never went anywhere and every now and then there would be one that was an incredible breakouts, most of the time starting out, a short little groundouts whereas the non innovative thinkers who hadn't had the real disruptive idea were just hitting singles and were much more consistent, they were not swinging for defense. the argument is to really be successful in a new way to open the new possibility in your field whether it is science or some other field you have to have this failure and error. that is what makes me see in silicon valley that there is a treme
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 12:00pm EDT
crucial moves of his life after he leaves milwaukee and goes to stanford law school is becoming a clerk to supreme court justice robert jackson. tell us about how bad is good for is conservatively and to some of the conservatism on blacks and whites. >> guest: right. jackson was, i think, is seen by then even as a great justice. and he had in the prosecutor at the norberg were trials. it actually taken time off from the court and gone to nuremberg and then a chief prosecutor and then come back to the court. and so rehnquist graduates are the stanford law school early at the end of 1952. he was in a cause that would've graduated a semester later, the rehnquist finishes work. he was so smart he got out early. so it was clear what now is researching through his papers and looking at the diaries that he had actually -- that were on deposit with his papers were fascinating. he had six notebooks that were filled with his reminiscences and desires and early comments on memoirs. one of the things that was clear was that he really saw himself destined for some important job. beyond the court pro
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 10:00pm EDT
reference and experience, but it's very difficult to share. my daughter-in-law's brother is a colonel and -- colonel and he apologized for having many years when we would talk on the phone -- there are differences between the military and the civilian culture. if you complain, the if you go for help, i may get demoted, you know there is -- one that wrote that we not only need more psychologists and social workers, we need to change the organization and the attitude towards the soldiers. >> at the same time that we are dealing with this suicide epidemic in the military, july being the worst month, you also have the issue of rapes in the military. i tell the story of suzanne twist and her mother, sarah rich. tell us what happened. >> host: suzanne, first of all, she was courted by the military. they kept calling her and calling her. a lot of these folks are part of military families anyway and treated her well and promising her she won't get deployed sort her mother was proud of her and then the minute she deployed to iraq, the guy above her says, let's just have a date, let's just be toget
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 6:00pm EDT
started out being an economics major because i thought i wanted to go to law school, discovered, in fact, that i really loved the study of rhetoric, which is one of the the most ancient faculties, and decided to just do both. c-span: and how did you get to the washington post? >> guest: well, my senior year at berkeley i did an internship at newsweek magazine in their san francisco bureau. and it was, as a lot of people's experience in journalism, you discover that you're right there smack in the middle of some pretty exciting things. that was the year that the mayor of san francisco was assassinated, moscone, and also, the jonestown massacre. and most of the people who had been killed or committed suicide down in jonestown were from the san francisco area. it was a church. the people from there had started out as a church in san francisco. so here i was, this sort of young person sort of thrust into this really -- to me, it seemed like, "wow. this is like the front seat of america." and so i came to washington shortly after graduation. i didn't have a job. i had a friend who had al
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